Ian McFarlane Reflects on his time at Sacramento International Horse Show

The Sacramento International Horse Show has been a show which I have attended for years now. I believe that we came here the first year that Rudy Leone and Dale Harvey put it on. Ever since the very first year it was very apparent that the management genuinely wanted to create an ever evolving showjumping experience that shatters expectations. Each year that the show has gone on I have observed that the quality and attendance of the show has risen significantly. This year the show looked fantastic with with the Longines banners and clocks all over the showgrounds and in the ring. Rudy Leone has done an amazing job each year with the footing as it is not a small undertaking considering they have to remove and replace the cutting and reining footing. The courses here have always been great, utilizing the size and shape of the arena. It is very good practice to ride in the indoor here as we do not have many other indoor jumper shows. The arena is not overly small however it is a great opportunity to give young horses experience in a spooky indoor where fences come up much quicker than normal. The fact that this ring is set up for World Cup Qualifiers provides a valuable and fun experience for both riders and horses. I believe this is true due to the added element of difficulty when riding in an indoor ring of that size. 

I have noticed more and more big name riders and trainers attending this show every year. The field of horses and riders this year was very strong and the quality of competition will be even higher because of it. The class sizes are for the most part large and the level of competition higher than I have ever seen it at Sacramento International before. The World Cup Qualifier on Saturday night was surely one to watch. The course designer did a great job of building challenging courses that were set to size while encouraging confident rounds. I look forward to this show every year not only because of the competition side but also the social side of the show. Everyone always seems to be in a good mood while watching World Cup Showjumping in a warm and welcoming environment.

The show at Sacramento was a week of learning for me. I have shown in the highs on my horse and the hunters and equitation on a very nice 6 year old. The highs presented a challenge for my horse and I because we have not showed in an indoor ring for a long time and I am still in the process of trying to stay consistent jumping 1.40m. The courses were challenging enough and I had a couple of rails due to silly mistakes on mine or my horses part. Saturday, my horse jumped very well in the the 1.40m and had the best time with a cheap rail at the second to last jump. I felt prepared for the high jr/ao classic on Sunday. I learned a number of valuable lessons in the indoor ring and riding a nice green horse in the hunter ring during the week. The staff from West Palms Events went out of their way to give me the awesome opportunity to shadow key players in the running of the horse show such as the course designer and the head FEI vet. I was given a new perspective and respect for just how much goes into running a successful show like this one from these experiences. Especially how many people work in the background quietly making the show run smoothly and effectively.

244GLEN2245_IAN_MCFARLANE

On a different note looking back on this week I learned the most valuable lesson through mistakes. I made a few mistakes over the course of the show that I will not allow myself to repeat. Sparing the details I now see just how important it is to be professional and optimistic as an up and coming rider. I learned more from some of the mistakes and errors i made than any success has taught me. When faced with a mistake or hardship it is important to me to both learn from it and to only take the good out of it. By this I mean acknowledging where I went wrong but then moving on and letting it go while taking away a lesson or an important observation from it. This applies to anything in my life in or out of the show ring. I also found that by simply observing the most successful riders and trainers there is almost always a common theme. That being a professional appearance, attitude, and demeanor. As I mature I look back on childish things I have done and I try to not repeat them. My current goal within this sport and business is to work on being as professional as I can be.

Share with a friend...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Ian McFarlane Reflects on his time at Sacramento International Horse Show

The Sacramento International Horse Show has been a show which I have attended for years now. I believe that we came here the first year that Rudy Leone and Dale Harvey put it on. Ever since the very first year it was very apparent that the management genuinely wanted to create an ever evolving showjumping experience that shatters expectations. Each year that the show has gone on I have observed that the quality and attendance of the show has risen significantly. This year the show looked fantastic with with the Longines banners and clocks all over the showgrounds and in the ring. Rudy Leone has done an amazing job each year with the footing as it is not a small undertaking considering they have to remove and replace the cutting and reining footing. The courses here have always been great, utilizing the size and shape of the arena. It is very good practice to ride in the indoor here as we do not have many other indoor jumper shows. The arena is not overly small however it is a great opportunity to give young horses experience in a spooky indoor where fences come up much quicker than normal. The fact that this ring is set up for World Cup Qualifiers provides a valuable and fun experience for both riders and horses. I believe this is true due to the added element of difficulty when riding in an indoor ring of that size. 

I have noticed more and more big name riders and trainers attending this show every year. The field of horses and riders this year was very strong and the quality of competition will be even higher because of it. The class sizes are for the most part large and the level of competition higher than I have ever seen it at Sacramento International before. The World Cup Qualifier on Saturday night was surely one to watch. The course designer did a great job of building challenging courses that were set to size while encouraging confident rounds. I look forward to this show every year not only because of the competition side but also the social side of the show. Everyone always seems to be in a good mood while watching World Cup Showjumping in a warm and welcoming environment.

The show at Sacramento was a week of learning for me. I have shown in the highs on my horse and the hunters and equitation on a very nice 6 year old. The highs presented a challenge for my horse and I because we have not showed in an indoor ring for a long time and I am still in the process of trying to stay consistent jumping 1.40m. The courses were challenging enough and I had a couple of rails due to silly mistakes on mine or my horses part. Saturday, my horse jumped very well in the the 1.40m and had the best time with a cheap rail at the second to last jump. I felt prepared for the high jr/ao classic on Sunday. I learned a number of valuable lessons in the indoor ring and riding a nice green horse in the hunter ring during the week. The staff from West Palms Events went out of their way to give me the awesome opportunity to shadow key players in the running of the horse show such as the course designer and the head FEI vet. I was given a new perspective and respect for just how much goes into running a successful show like this one from these experiences. Especially how many people work in the background quietly making the show run smoothly and effectively.

244GLEN2245_IAN_MCFARLANE

On a different note looking back on this week I learned the most valuable lesson through mistakes. I made a few mistakes over the course of the show that I will not allow myself to repeat. Sparing the details I now see just how important it is to be professional and optimistic as an up and coming rider. I learned more from some of the mistakes and errors i made than any success has taught me. When faced with a mistake or hardship it is important to me to both learn from it and to only take the good out of it. By this I mean acknowledging where I went wrong but then moving on and letting it go while taking away a lesson or an important observation from it. This applies to anything in my life in or out of the show ring. I also found that by simply observing the most successful riders and trainers there is almost always a common theme. That being a professional appearance, attitude, and demeanor. As I mature I look back on childish things I have done and I try to not repeat them. My current goal within this sport and business is to work on being as professional as I can be.

Share with a friend...
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone